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Freezing My Boys

Updated: Jul 29, 2019

Having cancer has me worrying about having kids.


Sperm production slows down or stops altogether after chemotherapy treatment [see How Cancer Treatment Can Affect Fertility in Men]. Some sperm production returns after a year to four years, but it may take up to ten years if it returns at all. In seven months, I turn fifty, and I’d rather be the 65-year-old high school student’s father than the 70-year-old one.


We don’t want to lose our chance for children, so I sought a solution.


Solution: We will save my semen, now, when it is strong, with cryopreservation, a.k.a. freezing my boys.


Sperm not actual size


Putting them on ice, though, is expensive! It costs anywhere from $200 to $500 or more, which includes neither the cost to keep them frozen (at least $75 a year which is a special for cancer patients) nor the cost to ship them back to us.


Then I learned of a company called Dadi, which will do the whole thing for $99 plus $99 a year to store it.! And… I get to do it at home.


So, coming today via FedEx is my Dadikit. (www.dadikit.com)


"Store your sperm, stop the clock"


There is only one effective way to get my semen out into the cup, so Rachel and I have plans Monday morning. We then drop my boys off at FedEx, and off they go for freezing.

The package goes straight to Dadi’s lab, where “a technician examines the deposit in order to evaluate the volume, count, and concentration of the sperm. [They then] email [me] a personalized fertility report including video of [my] actual sperm.”  They even separate my deposit into three vials to give us three tries if we require it.


I promise to post the video.


We thought getting pregnant would cost more money that we could afford. IVF (in vitro fertilization) can cost $12,000 to $15,000! But we will not need that;  there is a simpler way of fertilizing her egg when Rachel ovulates. Basically, a fertility clinic will defrost the sperm and then use a syringe to inject it into Rachel’s cervix or uterus. In fact, we can do the insemination at home!


But we’ll probably go to a clinic.

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